Char Visits

**Retroactive posts because of low internet again, 2 more to come tomorrow!

*August 14, 2011

Today marked our first day of validation among the chars. We are very lucky that the director of community health services from the Head Office is accompanying us these next few days as well. He brings a wealth of experience and knowledge, about Friendship and about our health services on the field, that neither Sareeta Apa nor I possibly match. His ownership is a pivotal part of this project – without him, we don’t have leverage or the investment needed to finalize and distribute the tools, and advocate for monitoring and evaluation culture, in general.

We were also accompanied by my translator today, a kind-faced young fellow who ended up not only translating for me, but also eagerly took on the role of cultural ambassador, pointing to fish farms and different crops, to villages “where victims of river erosion live,” to bridges destroyed by floods and newly rebuilt. As we drove down to the riverside and hunkered down on the boat (it would take us 3.5 hours on the water each way today, excluding FCM pick-up time from different islands), he leaned over to tell me this was his first time on a boat like this. I smiled, asking: “Why? You live so close to water!” His answer, delivered with a nervous smile: “I’m so, so afraid of the water!” A part of me felt for him, especially when his mother called to ask if he was wearing a life jacket. In that instant, I realized a newfound appreciation for how far I’ve come with my own parents. They still worry, but I also think I’ve set the bar high enough that I can picture my dad being a bit disappointed if I didn’t take on some of the adventures that have come my way. My translator rose above, though, even coming with us to the roof of the boat from time to time.

A gray sky, with periodic bouts of rain, accompanied us on our long journey through the river. We visited two chars today, Mollarchar and Shonnashir Char, where satellite clinics were taking place. Both are stable chars that have had a lifetime of 15 to 20 years.

Because I had a translator, we were able to effectively delegate validation of the tools as the satellite clinic took place. The health meetings (uthan boitak) were delegated to me. On our first char, the FCM had just given birth, so instead the assistant health manager gave the meeting on fever and diarrhea. I pulled out the tool, made up of about fifteen benchmarks, and listened to my translator as he transliterated the lesson. I observed the audience, participation level, and the relationship between the manager and the attendees. One by one, I could see the components of the checklist coming to life! It was an amazing feeling and happy warmth rushed through my body.

The same happened on the second char, where this time the FCM gave the uthan boitak to some attendees. The tool also incorporates a check-in with one of the meeting attendees, a short interview to assess quality conducted on a private basis away from the satellite clinic. On both chars, my translator helped me to ask questions to women beneficiaries regarding the topics discussed, such as if the beneficiary is planning to, or has already used advice that she’s learned at the health meetings, and if she feels comfortable asking questions during the meeting. This went smoothly, as well, with one of the women even saying that because of the health meetings, she now knows how to make oral saline solution at home for her children whenever they have diarrhea. Perfect. That’s what we want!

I noticed some points of dissonance with the checklists, though – for example, the culture of taking attendance had disappeared somewhat from the meetings and needs to be brought back so we can track community involvement.

Once we were back in Gaibandha later on, a check-in with my supervisors revealed that there’d been frustrations about the distance traveled versus the actual amount of time spent at the clinics validating (about an hour each). I didn’t have any control over this and though I agreed, the selfish part of me enjoyed each of the seven hours I got to gaze at the gurgling water of the river, the numerous chars new and old, green and amber.

1 Comment

Filed under FCMs, Field, Satellite clinic, Supervision and Monitoring Tools, Travel

One response to “Char Visits

  1. Bindhu

    Hi Burcu!
    Just wanted to let you know my mom loved your blog 🙂
    Hope everything is going well and I look forward to seeing you back at school,
    Bindhu

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