Tag Archives: flooding

On the field again

*August 13, 2011

Our bus from Dhaka to Gaibandha lasted about eight hours today. We tumbled north through the narrow, moldering highways that connect this part of the world to the rest of Bangladesh. As a fourth-timer on such buses, the constant honking and fierce rocking from side to side no longer bother me. As we wobble and sway past rice paddies, quaint villages and verdant countryside, I pretend it’s all some sort of sweet lullaby and this chimera eases me to and from sleep.

From the onset, I can already tell Gaibandha is better off than Chilmari, the region of my first field stay. In the city center of Chilmari, dirt-floored convenience stores, metal roofed cook shacks, one-story makeshift shops and kiosks with crumbling foundations and paint line the streets, whereas in Gaibandha, we strolled past numerous fabric shops, handicraft shops, and shops that even sold TVs and motorbikes, that look better-maintained, more diverse. Gaibandha just seems livelier, too. After iftar at the Friendship Gaibandha office, we joined all kinds of hawkers and pedestrians on the streets, joining a throng of locals going for their evening tea. Actually much of what I know of Gaibandha comes from constant news reports of extreme flooding in this area over the past several weeks.

The purpose of our field visit, scheduled to last for five days, is to validate the monitoring tools completed so far – more precisely, our service checklists for the FCM’s one-on-one family planning counseling, for the uthan boitak or the community health meetings that the FCMs conduct, the checklist for the physical set-up of the satellite clinics and finally, our antenatal and postnatal care counseling. Tomorrow, we’ll visit a couple of chars to validate the tools on-site, and assess whether we are indeed where we need to be (in the ball park). In two days, we have a scheduled meeting with the health program managers and paramedics to go through the tools. Then, we’ll return to the chars for another round of validating and feedback from the on-site health workers and paramedics.

As our group walked around the city center after evening tea, I couldn’t help but ponder how fast time has flown. I’m proud of what we’ve done with this project, despite its ups and downs. Hopefully, our conversations with the field staff will make the tools that much better, that much more relevant. At the same time, on a more personal note, the fact that this might be my last time in the field and among the chars is a heart-breaking kind of realization, and one that resonated within me unstoppably tonight. It certainly makes my final departure from Bangladesh in three weeks that much real-er.

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Filed under Dhaka, FCMs, Field, Supervision and Monitoring Tools