Tag Archives: health access

Allies on the Field

*July 5, 2011

I talk a lot about geographical barriers in the chars. My trip today to the Gaibandha field office is a perfect case in point of how arduous it can be to travel from Point A to Point B. Sareeta Apa and I left EFH early in the morning for a half-hour boat ride to the mainland. From there, another 20 minutes with a motorized rickshaw took us to the stop where we got on absolutely the most full public bus (a fun and funny experience all at the same time). We spent about an hour on the bus, and afterwards, took a motorcycle to the Gaibandha Field Office. Friendship was recently voted as the best-performing NGO in Gaibandha for 2011 (more information here).

We followed the same structure of the health meeting we had in Chilmari, with the main purpose of trying to identify the strengths and gaps in our current monitoring and supervision tools. Three paramedics, a health manager and the district supervisor attended the meeting – an impressive showing considering that today was the first day of a 48-hour hartal or national strike in Bangladesh. The strike is a result of recent political developments, namely a recent constitutional amendment which scrapped the provision for a pre-election caretaker government, making it so that elections will be held under an interim party government from now on.

Some of the best parts of these conversations is not only that we get valuable feedback from the level of the organization that deals directly with the community beneficiaries, but we also establish partnerships with the true program implementers. The significance of this cannot be understated. We leave these conversations with an overwhelming consensus that program monitoring and evaluation will help Friendship identify the problems in its programs and find ways to rectify them. The Friendship field staff are the most valuable allies we can have.

In addition to visiting the Gaibandha office, we also visited two NGOs to gain information about some of their own monitoring and progress-tracking tools. Namely, we visited GUK, which works in five districts in the North to strengthen coping capacity as climate change occurs. I was also impressed with the work of Akota, an NGO operating in Gaibandha that aims to establish sustainable livelihood with various interventions ranging from gender, justice and human rights to health, sanitation and environment.

Because of these various encounters and exchanges, I think a lot about the words that comprise my generally accepted epistome of development. It’s a constant tug-of-war in my head as I aim to answer my own questions of the macro vs. micro, quality vs. quality, collective vs. personal, what is actually possible with NGOs and what is not. I came to Bangladesh to seek clarity in some of these questions, but the obstacle of reconciling all of the parts of my experience will prove to be harder than I thought. One thing is for sure – for years, Friendship has prioritized the quantity over the quality to follow its philosophy of ensuring health access for all. My internship project is part of a strategic move on part of Friendship to review and fortify, to ensure quality access. This a daunting task given Friendship’s many arms and mere coverage, one that is made more onerous by some of the same barriers our beneficiaries face – geographic, economic, and even social obstacles that separate the Head Office from the field work.

On a simpler note, as we were leaving the mainland, we spotted a huge gathering of folks, singing in a narrow path next to a house. It’s impossible to observe anything here without attracting attention, so Sareeta Apa and I were ushered to the front to see a tradition that is a part of a Hindu wedding. It’s sights like this that make me feel like one of the luckiest people on Earth.

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